and run up bills or commit crimes in your name. Your Safety Net 首列中欧班列抵达

College-University Strathclyde Uni and Associates quick facts on phishing scams, fraud and boiler rooms. A warning before investing and how to protect your personal information online from internet fraudsters. The Bait: Email or pop-up messages that claim to be from a business or organization you may deal with say, an Internet Service Provider (ISP), bank, online payment service, or even a government agency. The message may ask you to "update," "validate," or "confirm" your account information or face dire consequences. The Catch: Phishing is a scam where internet fraudsters send spam or pop-up messages to reel in personal and financial information from unsuspecting victims. The messages direct you to a website that looks just like a legitimate organization’s site, or to a phone number purporting to be real. But these are bogus and exist simply to trick you into divulging your personal information so the operators can steal it, fake your identity, and run up bills or commit crimes in your name. Your Safety Net: Make it a policy never to respond to emails or pop-ups that ask for your personal or financial information, click on links in the message, or call phone numbers given in the message. Don’t cut and paste a link from the message into your Web browser, either: phishers can make links look like they go one place, but then actually take you to a look-alike site. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization using a phone number you know to be genuine, or open a new internet browser session and type in the company’s correct Web address yourself. Using anti-virus and anti-spyware software and a firewall, and keeping them up to date, can help. Forward phishing emails to [email protected] and to the organization that is being spoofed. Strathclyde Uni and Associates quick facts on phishing scams: Work-at-Home Scams The Bait: Advertisements that promise steady income for minimal labor in medical claims processing, envelope-stuffing, craft assembly work, or other jobs. The ads use similar come-ons: Fast cash. Minimal work. No risk. And the advantage of working from home when it’s convenient for you. The Catch: The ads don’t say you may have to work many hours without pay, or pay hidden costs to place newspaper ads, make photocopies, or buy supplies, software, or equipment to do the job. Once you put in your own time and money, you’re likely to find promoters who refuse to pay you, claiming that your work isn’t up to their "quality standards." Your Safety Net: The FTC has yet to find anyone who has gotten rich stuffing envelopes or assembling magnets at home. Legitimate work-at-home business promoters should tell you in writing exactly what’s involved in the program they’re selling. Before you commit any money, find out what tasks you will have to perform, whether you will be paid a salary or work on commission, who will pay you, when you will get your first paycheck, the total cost of the program including supplies, equipment and membership fees and what you will get for your money. Can you verify information from current workers? Be aware of "shills," people who are paid to lie and give you every reason to pay for work. Get professional advice from a lawyer, an accountant, a financial advisor, or another expert if you need it, and check out the company with your local consumer protection agency, state Attorney General and the Better Business Bureau not only where the company is located, but also where you live. About the Author: 相关的主题文章:

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